Saturday, December 31, 2016

Association of Indian Physicians of Northern Ohio Medical Yatra

Association of Indian Physicians of Northern Ohio (AIPNO) was founded in 1983 as a non-profit organization of physicians of Indian origin in Northern Ohio.

With a membership of over 300 physicians who meet regularly for educational, charitable and social events, the organization provides an opportunity to make meaningful contributions to the local community and to make friendships that last.

AIPNO also provides service and aid to undeserved areas and disaster affected sites. The Medical YATRA Mission is to Educate, Prevent and Save Lives!

More on the AIPNO Medical Yatras


Roberto Clemente

Roberto Clemente was an amazing baseball player and an even better human being.

When the earthquake hit Managua, Nicaragua on December 23, 1972 thousands were killed and many more homeless.  Clemente helped organize a relief effort.

On New Year's Eve he and 4 other boarded a plane for Managua with supplies to help the people. Shortly after takeoff the plane crashed into the ocean and all were killed.

In 1973, Roberto Clemente became the first Hispanic player elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Friday, December 30, 2016

Thursday, December 29, 2016

International New Year Traditions

Here are a few international New Year traditions:

First Stepper. A very old tradition in England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales revolves around your guests on New Year's Day. The first person to enter your home in the New Year will have a significant impact on year's to come. Here's how you can take part in this tradition.
Make note of who that first person is to enter your home. In fact, you may want to write it down, since the information won't really be of use to you for a year. At then end of the year decide if your year has been a good one or a bad one; lucky or unlucky. If you feel it has been a positive year then on the next New Year's Day, don't let anyone else in the house until that first person from the "lucky year" comes in.
If, however, you have had a bad or unlucky year, do whatever you must to have someone else be "the first stepper" into your home, so the luck will change for the upcoming year.



The Dutch believe it is important to "eat out the Old Year and Eat in the New" so they start a meal before midnight and finish it after, just to be sure there is food all year.




Although it is said that farm animals talk on New Year's Day, a superstition from Romania says it is important to avoid the animals because hearing them talk is very bad luck.




Egyptians once believed that onions kept evil spirits away; so many New Year's dishes with Egyptian roots will include onions.




Eating twelve grapes at midnight is a Spanish custom also said to bring good luck.




In Denmark, residents keep a pile of dishes, all broken, in front of the door. For this they save old dishes and People usually throw these on the friends’ doors during New Year. This symbolizes friendship and brotherhood and they believe the one with maximum dishes outside, has the most friends. Some Danish are found to leap some chairs during midnight.




Brazilians believe that lentils signify wealth and prosperity. So they serve food items made up of the legume like soup or rice on the New Year.




Germans pour molten lead into cold water and the shape that is taken after, predicts the future. Heart shapes symbolize marriage whereas round shapes denote good luck; anchor shapes tell that you need help however a cross signifies someone’s sad demise.




Filipinos consume grapes, have coins, wear polkas dotted dresses, as they have faith that circular things attract more fortune and money. They also throw coins as New Year begins to increase wealth and prosperity.




Japanese New Year or Oshogatsu is meant for celebrations with family and it begins with proper decoration of the home to welcome luck and fortune. They clean the entire house, get themselves off from every financial liability, and resolve all issues before the New Year hits. They follow traditions of three things: a pine branch, called kadomatsu, denotes longevity; a stalk of bamboo symbolizes prosperity, whereas a plum blossom shows nobility. Before the clock strikes 12, they ring 108 bells to show that the all 108 troubles have been eliminated.

Friday, December 16, 2016

Multicultural Fashion Show Grand Finale

The Multicultural Fashion Show at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation ended with a bang as all of the 120 people who participated in the fashion show came back on stage.

Ethnic groups in Cleveland and Northeast Ohio


Multicultural Fashion Show Part 4: Palestine to Zambia

The Multicultural Fashion Show at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation continued.

120 people participated in the fashion show and each walked the runway to music from their country.

The fourth group included fashions from Palestine, Puerto Rico, Russia, Senegal, Serbia, Tanzania and Zambia.

Ethnic communities in Cleveland


Multicultural Fashion Show Part 3: Lebanon to Nepal

The Multicultural Fashion Show at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation continued. 120 people participated in the fashion show and each walked the runway to music from their country.


The third group included fashions from Lebanon, Lithuania, Mexico, Morocco and Nepal.

See all of Cleveland's ethnic communities




Multicultural Fashion Show Part 2: Egypt to Kuwait

The Multicultural Fashion Show at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation continued. 120 people participated in the fashion show and each walked the runway to music from their country.

 The second group included fashions from Egypt, Hawaii, the Hmong Community, Iran, Jordan and Kuwait.

Cleveland's ethnic communities


Multicultural Fashion Show Part 1: Armenia to China

ICC-WIN president Ken Kovach welcomed the crowd to the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.

He then introduced Fashion Show Chair Nada Martinovic and the 2016 Fashion Show began.  120 people participated in the fashion show and each walked the runway to music from their country.

The first group included fashions from Armenia, Bavaria, Bhutan, Cameroon and China.

Cleveland's ethnic communities


Tepehuani Nelli Mexican Ensemble in Cleveland

Tepehuani Nelli Mexican Ensemble performed traditional Aztec and Mexican dances at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.

Mexicans in Cleveland


Thursday, December 15, 2016

Drums and dances from Senegal at Cleveland Multicultural Party

The second performance from JAPO African Ensemble from Senegal on drums and in dance at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.

African in Cleveland


JAPO African Ensemble at Cleveland Multicultural Party

JAPO African Ensemble from Senegal performed on drums and in a dance at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.

Africans in Cleveland


2016 ICC-WIN Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration Welcome

ICC-WIN president Ken Kovach welcomed the crowd to the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation ended.

He also introduced event Chairman Mehmet Gencer who thanked the committee members and then Nada Martinovic who chaired the performances.


Honor the Moon dance by Sho Jo Ji Japanese Dancers

The Sho Jo Ji Japanese Dancers performed a dance honoring the moon at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.

Japanese in Cleveland




Royal procession dance by Sho Jo Ji Japanese Dancers

The Sho Jo Ji Japanese Dancers performed a dance telling the story of royal lords and ladies processing into Edo which later was renamed as Tokyo.  They performed at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.

Japanese in Cleveland


Sakura (Cherry Blossom) dance by Sho Jo Ji Japanese Dancers

Sakura (Cherry Blossom) dance by Sho Jo Ji Japanese Dancers at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation. This is the 60th anniversary of Sho-Jo-Ji which was founded in 1956.

Japanese in Cleveland


Impromptu dance jam at Cleveland multicultural party

When the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation was over, people wanted to stay for more.  Several jumped on stage and began dancing.


Goodnight from Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration

ICC-WIN president Ken Kovach thanked the crowd and gave best wishes as the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation ended.

Cleveland ethnic events


Grand Finale from Hula Fusion Polynesian Ensemble

The grand finale hula dance from the Hula Fusion Polynesian Ensemble at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.

More Cleveland ethnic events


Hula Fusion Polynesian Ensemble at Cleveland Multicultural Party

Yet another hula dance.

Dancers from the Hula Fusion Polynesian Ensemble performed another traditional hula dance at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.


Another Hula dance from Hula Fusion Polynesian Ensemble

Dancers from the Hula Fusion Polynesian Ensemble performed a traditional hula dance at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.


Hula dance about Seaweed at Cleveland Multicultural Party

Dancers from the Hula Fusion Polynesian Ensemble performed a traditional hula dance about seaweed at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.


Pacific Islanders in Cleveland

More Cleveland ethnic event coverage


Traditional Hula dance at Cleveland Multicultural Party

Dancers from the Hula Fusion Polynesian Ensemble performed a traditional hula dance at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.

This was their introduction and opening dance.


Hula dance from Tahiti at Cleveland Multicultural Party

Dancers from the Hula Fusion Polynesian Ensemble performed a hula dance from Tahiti at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.

Pacific Islanders in Cleveland

ICC-WIN party and other ethnic events in Cleveland



Electric ball dance from New Zealand

A dancer from the Hula Fusion Polynesian Ensemble performed a New Zealand dance with two lighted balls on strings in the dark called Electric Poi at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.


New Zealanders in Cleveland


Wednesday, December 07, 2016

Pear Harbor Day Remembered

A Day that will live in Infamy

75 years! How the world has changed in the 75 years since the December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor.

We talked to some local people about their memories of that day. Here are some excerpts of what they had to say.

One woman remembers being a young girl at the time.

"I was at home with my family listening to Irish music on the radio, when they cut in and told us Pearl Harbor had been bombed. We didn't know what to do - I was only eleven years old, but I was sure we were going to be bombed and we were all going into battle. I had to do something, but I had no idea what. So I prepared as best I could. I cleaned all of my drawers and organized all of my things. I was going to be ready if we were invaded.
The next day was a Holy Day - Mary's Day - the Feast of the Immaculate Conception. As Catholics we all went to Mass and afterwards everyone stood around together outside. The adults were all talking very seriously and the kids were all looking up to see if there were planes coming to bomb us.



The burning wreckage of the U.S. Navy battleship USS Arizona (BB-39)
at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii December 7, 1941.


Kevin says:

"Sure, it changed our lives a lot. But not as much as places like England and Europe who were being bombed all the time. I was pretty young - only 8 - so I don't know a lot of details. But everyone was always serious and scared.
All of a sudden there would be a loud shrill noise - a siren it was. Then there would be an Air Raid Drill. Everyone had to turn off all of their lights and pull their shades down, so the enemy couldn't find us. No one was allowed outside. There was a neighborhood man who would come around and make sure we were all following the rules. It was very scary."


Everyone seemed to remember the drills. The other thing they remembered were the rationing and shortages. Everyone was allotted a certain amount of food stamps and gas cards and somehow they had to make it work. Nylon stockings were unavailable - nylon was needed for the war. Meat was sent to the troops. There were year long waiting lists for new cars and a new pair of shoes was like gold.

Grace explains the feeling.

"There were no protests in the streets. Everybody was proud of the USA. Even Hollywood supported the country. Many of them did USO shows. Bob Hope was never home for the holidays. He was always off entertaining the troops. We all banded together.
I got married in November, 1941. My husband went to the war. So did my cousins, brothers, uncles and friends. Some came home, some didn't. We were proud as could be of each and every one of them. It was such a different time."






USS Pennsylvania, behind the wreckage of
the USS Downes and USS Cassin
.


As serious as everything was at that time there was also a special feeling of camaraderie. Here's how Laura describes it:

"Pianos were very popular at the time. That was a big form of entertainment. After Pearl Harbor we still stood around the piano but now the songs were all about the war and very patriotic. We didn't have a television so we went to the movies a lot. There was always a newsreel before the feature that kept us informed. We all read the newspapers and listened to the radio too. Even little kids wore buttons on their coats calling for the death of "the rats": Hitler, Mussolini and Tojo.
Sometimes I think we all got closer because we had a common enemy."

All of the people we talked to remember sending Care Packages. Some contained toiletries and Band-Aids while others sent cookies and food from home. They all knew anything from home was welcome.
Many women started working outside the home for the first time. Working ten to twelve hours seven days a week in a factory was not unusual.




Of course this meant children learned to do things they never had to do before. Cooking, cleaning, even shopping fell in the hands of people in the home.

Mildred remembers another change:

"All of a sudden stars started showing up in the windows of people's homes. If I remember correctly, a blue star meant they had someone in the service, and a gold star meant someone died. Some houses had a lot of stars - I guess those were the ones with a lot of sons. Course women went in the WAVES and WACS too, but I didn't know any. It was the boys that I remember going.

And then one day when I went to Church there was a plague up on the wall and it listed the names of the guys from our church and our neighborhood who had died in the war. I couldn't believe it. I knew some of those guys - or their families. Then every week when we went to church the plague had more names.

We started hearing stories about what I call real heroes. The guys who were at Pearl Harbor. The ones who were shot down on their last trip - or even their first trip. The ones who had permanent disabilities as a result of their service. And the women who were left at home with little kids. These are heroes. We all prayed like crazy for all of them."


Inside the shrine room of the USS Arizona memorial in Pearl Harbor - To the Memory of the Gallant Men Here Entombed and their shipmates who gave their lives in action on December 7, 1941, on the U.S.S. Arizona" — inscription in marble with the names of Arizona's honored dead


December 7, 1941. President Roosevelt declared it to be a Date That Will Live in Infamy. How right he was.

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Drummer at Lebanon Day in Cleveland

Nemr Soueidi performed on the drum to get the crowd dancing at the 6th annual celebration of Lebanon Day in the City of Cleveland celebrating the 73rd independence of Lebanon. 

More from the 2016 Lebanon Day in Cleveland


Ajyal Dabke Dance Group at Lebanon Day in Cleveland

The American Lebanese Community Council presented the 6th annual celebration of Lebanon Day in the City of Cleveland celebrating the 73rd independence of Lebanon.  The ceremony was in the Rotunda of Cleveland City Hall.

The Ajyal Dabke Dance Group performed these two traditional dances.


More from the 2016 Lebanon Day in Cleveland






 and


 

Little girl joins Belly Dancer at Lebanon Day in Cleveland

The American Lebanese Community Council presented the 6th annual celebration of Lebanon Day in the City of Cleveland celebrating the 73rd independence of Lebanon.  The ceremony was in the Rotunda of Cleveland City Hall.

A belly dancer from the Lions of the Desert Dance Company performed this dance and was joined by a little girl at the end.


More from the 2016 Lebanon Day in Cleveland


Middle East Belly Dancer at Lebanon Day in Cleveland

The American Lebanese Community Council presented the 6th annual celebration of Lebanon Day in the City of Cleveland celebrating the 73rd independence of Lebanon.  The ceremony was in the Rotunda of Cleveland City Hall.

A belly dancer from the Lions of the Desert Dance Company performed this dance.


More from the 2016 Lebanon Day in Cleveland


Lions of the Desert Mideast Dance

The American Lebanese Community Council presented the 6th annual celebration of Lebanon Day in the City of Cleveland celebrating the 73rd independence of Lebanon.  The ceremony was in the Rotunda of Cleveland City Hall.

A belly dancer from the Lions of the Desert Dance Company performed.


More from the 2016 Lebanon Day in Cleveland


Lebanese Young Adults in Cleveland

The American Lebanese Community Council presented the 6th annual celebration of Lebanon Day in the City of Cleveland celebrating the 73rd independence of Lebanon.  The ceremony was in the Rotunda of Cleveland City Hall.

Julia Bejjani spoke about the American Lebanese Community Council Young Adults group.



More from the 2016 Lebanon Day in Cleveland


Lebanese Cultural Garden in Cleveland - Future Plans

The American Lebanese Community Council presented the 6th annual celebration of Lebanon Day in the City of Cleveland celebrating the 73rd independence of Lebanon.  The ceremony was in the Rotunda of Cleveland City Hall.

 Natalie Ronayne is Chairperson of the Lebanese Cultural Garden Committee and she and committee member Amy McDonald showed the future plans of the Lebanese Garden.


More from the 2016 Lebanon Day in Cleveland




Lebanese Cultural Garden Update – Natalie Ronayne

The American Lebanese Community Council presented the 6th annual celebration of Lebanon Day in the City of Cleveland celebrating the 73rd independence of Lebanon.  The ceremony was in the Rotunda of Cleveland City Hall.

Natalie Ronayne is Chairperson of the Lebanese Cultural Garden Committee and she gave an overview of the proposed Lebanese Garden.


More from the 2016 Lebanon Day in Cleveland


Pierre and Mary Bejjani 24th anniversary - Lebanon Day in Cleveland

The American Lebanese Community Council presented the 6th annual celebration of Lebanon Day in the City of Cleveland celebrating the 73rd independence of Lebanon.  The ceremony was in the Rotunda of Cleveland City Hall.

ALCC President Pierre Bejjani introduced his wife Mary as they were celebrating their 24th wedding anniversary.


More from the 2016 Lebanon Day in Cleveland


Mr. Joe Coury honored at 2016 Lebanon Day in Cleveland

The American Lebanese Community Council presented the 6th annual celebration of Lebanon Day in the City of Cleveland celebrating the 73rd independence of Lebanon.  The ceremony was in the Rotunda of Cleveland City Hall.

ALCC President Pierre Bejjani introduced Mr. Joe Coury who was honored posthumously at the event.


More from the 2016 Lebanon Day in Cleveland


Mr. George Maloof honored at 2016 Lebanon Day in Cleveland

The American Lebanese Community Council presented the 6th annual celebration of Lebanon Day in the City of Cleveland celebrating the 73rd independence of Lebanon.  The ceremony was in the Rotunda of Cleveland City Hall.  

ALCC President Pierre Bejjani introduced Mr. George Maloof who was honored at the event.


More from the 2016 Lebanon Day in Cleveland


Ther Importance of Lebanon Day in Cleveland – Pierre Bejjani

The American Lebanese Community Council presented the 6th annual celebration of Lebanon Day in the City of Cleveland celebrating the 73rd independence of Lebanon.  The ceremony was in the Rotunda of Cleveland City Hall.

ALCC President Pierre Bejjani spoke about the importance of the day.

More from the 2016 Lebanon Day in Cleveland


Lebanon Day in Cleveland – Councilman Brian Cummins

The American Lebanese Community Council presented the 6th annual celebration of Lebanon Day in the City of Cleveland celebrating the 73rd independence of Lebanon.  The ceremony was in the Rotunda of Cleveland City Hall.

Cleveland Councilman Brian Cummins congratulated the Lebanese community and presented a proclamation to Pierre Bejjani.

More from the 2016 Lebanon Day in Cleveland


Lebanon Day in Cleveland – Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish

The American Lebanese Community Council presented the 6th annual celebration of Lebanon Day in the City of Cleveland celebrating the 73rd independence of Lebanon.  The ceremony was in the Rotunda of Cleveland City Hall.

Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish presented a proclamation to Pierre Bejjani.

More from the 2016 Lebanon Day in Cleveland


Lebanon Day in Cleveland – Mayor Frank Jackson

The American Lebanese Community Council presented the 6th annual celebration of Lebanon Day in the City of Cleveland celebrating the 73rd independence of Lebanon.  The ceremony was in the Rotunda of Cleveland City Hall.

Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson congratulated the Lebanese community and presented a proclamation to Pierre Bejjani.


More from the 2016 Lebanon Day in Cleveland


Lebanon Day in Cleveland – Imam Islambouli Invocation

The American Lebanese Community Council presented the 6th annual celebration of Lebanon Day in the City of Cleveland celebrating the 73rd independence of Lebanon.  The ceremony was in the Rotunda of Cleveland City Hall.

Imam Ramez Islambouli gave one of the invocations to begin the ceremony.



More from the 2016 Lebanon Day in Cleveland


Lebanon Day in Cleveland – Fr. John Ojaimi Invocation

The American Lebanese Community Council presented the 6th annual celebration of Lebanon Day in the City of Cleveland celebrating the 73rd independence of Lebanon.  The ceremony was in the Rotunda of Cleveland City Hall.

Father John Ojaimi, Pastor of Saint George Antiochian Christian Church, gave one of the invocations to begin the ceremony.

More from the 2016 Lebanon Day in Cleveland


Lebanon Day 2016 in Cleveland – Color Guard and National Anthems

The American Lebanese Community Council presented the 6th annual celebration of Lebanon Day in the City of Cleveland celebrating the 73rd independence of Lebanon.  The ceremony was in the Rotunda of Cleveland City Hall.

It began with Mistresses of Ceremonies Racha Alameh and Tamore Gemayel Ayoub introducing the US Army Color Guard and the playing of the national anthems of the United States and Lebanon.

More from 2016 Lebanon Day in Cleveland


Sunday, November 20, 2016

University Circle’s Chris Ronayne – Cultural Gardens time capsule

Chris Ronayne leads both University Circle Inc. and the Holden Parks Trust.  He spoke at a ceremony after the Cleveland Cultural Gardens Federation ended their Centennial Year by burying a time capsule at the Kiosk of the Gardens on MLK Blvd.

The time capsule has information and artifacts about the Gardens and also Cleveland in 2016.  (Go Cavs, Go Tribe)  It will be opened in 25 years in 2041.

 After placing the time capsule they gathered at the Rockefeller Greenhouse to cut a cake celebrating the Centennial of the Gardens.  Chris spoke of the importance of the Gardens and the partnership.

More of the Cultural Gardens time capsule

Happy 100th Birthday after Cleveland Cultural Gardens Time Capsule

The Cleveland Cultural Gardens Federation ended their Centennial Year by burying a time capsule at the Kiosk of the Gardens on MLK Blvd. The time capsule has information and artifacts about the Gardens and also Cleveland in 2016.  (Go Cavs, Go Tribe)

It will be opened in 25 years in 2041.

After placing the time capsule they gathered at the Rockefeller Greenhouse to cut a cake celebrating the Centennial of the Gardens.

 Past president Paul Burik and current president Sheila Crawford spoke and the crowd sang happy birthday.


More on Cultural Gardens time capsule 



Time Capsule buried in Cleveland Cultural Gardens

The Cleveland Cultural Gardens Federation ended their Centennial Year by burying a time capsule at the Kiosk of the Gardens on MLK Blvd.

The time capsule has information and artifacts about the Gardens and also Cleveland in 2016.  (Go Cavs, Go Tribe)  It will be opened in 25 years in 2041.

 Paul Burik was the main person behind the time capsule project.




Friday, November 11, 2016

Asians and Liver, Colon and other cancers

Li Li, MD, PhD has over 25 years of experience as a primary care doctor and family practitioner.  Dr. Li is also a Mary Ann Swetland Professor of Environmental Health Sciences at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.  He spoke at an event hosted by Immigration Attorney Margaret Wong about the health issues of the Asian population. 

In this video, Dr. Li says that Asian Americans are the first racial/ethnic group to experience cancer as the leading cause of death.  He gave an example of liver cancer in Los Angeles.  He also showed how meat consumption correlates with colon cancer.






Leading cause of death among Asian Americans is Cancer

Li Li, MD, PhD has over 25 years of experience as a primary care doctor and family practitioner.  Dr. Li is also a Mary Ann Swetland Professor of Environmental Health Sciences at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.  He spoke at an event hosted by Immigration Attorney Margaret Wong about the health issues of the Asian population.

 In this video, Dr. Li says that the leading cause of death among Asian Americans is Cancer.  For Caucasians and others it is often cardiovascular.


Asians in Cleveland



Asians are fastest growing racial/ethnic group in the US

Li Li, MD, PhD has over 25 years of experience as a primary care doctor and family practitioner.  Dr. Li is also a Mary Ann Swetland Professor of Environmental Health Sciences at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.  He spoke at an event hosted by Immigration Attorney Margaret Wong about the health issues of the Asian population.

  In this video, Dr. Li says that Asians are the fastest growing racial/ethnic group in the US but unlike Hispanics the growth comes more from immigration than birthrate. 





Life Expectancy varies 10 years in under 10 miles

Li Li, MD, PhD has over 25 years of experience as a primary care doctor and family practitioner.  Dr. Li is also a Mary Ann Swetland Professor of Environmental Health Sciences at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

  He spoke at an event hosted by Immigration Attorney Margaret Wong about the health issues of the Asian population.

  In this video, Dr. Li tells about a report in Cuyahoga County that shows how life expectancy is 10 years shorter in Glenville in Cleveland than in suburban Lyndhurst just a few miles away.

Cleveland Asians


Obesity is like a Weapon of Mass Destruction

Li Li, MD, PhD has over 25 years of experience as a primary care doctor and family practitioner.  Dr. Li is also a Mary Ann Swetland Professor of Environmental Health Sciences at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. 

He spoke at an event hosted by Immigration Attorney Margaret Wong about the health issues of the Asian population. 

In this video, Dr. Li speaks in Mandarin and he is translated to English.  He says that Obesity is like a Weapon of Mass Destruction in America.  Preventive medicine needs to look at individual and cultural characteristics. 

Asians in Cleveland


Asian community has unique culture and health issues

Li Li, MD, PhD has over 25 years of experience as a primary care doctor and family practitioner.  Dr. Li is also a Mary Ann Swetland Professor of Environmental Health Sciences at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. 

He spoke at an event hosted by Immigration Attorney Margaret Wong about the health issues of the Asian population. 

In this video, Judy Wong introduces Dr. Li and he begins by saying much of the media focuses on Caucasian, African-American and Hispanic cultures but the Asian community has its own unique culture and health issues. 



What kind of wok should you use?

Rose Wong is the founder of Pearl of the Orient restaurant which was the first restaurant in Cleveland Ohio to offer Northern and Szechuan Chinese cuisine when it opened in 1978.  She gave a cooking demonstration about Healthy Asian Cooking at an event at her sister Margaret Wong’s law offices. 

She was asked what kind of wok you should use.  She recommended a carbon steel wok but watch out for rust.  Rose told how to clean it and prevent rust.



1000 year old egg Chinese salad

It doesn't sound appetizing but...

Rose Wong is the founder of Pearl of the Orient restaurant which was the first restaurant in Cleveland Ohio to offer Northern and Szechuan Chinese cuisine when it opened in 1978.  She gave a cooking demonstration about Healthy Asian Cooking at an event at her sister Margaret Wong’s law offices.  

She made a 1000 year old salad using soft tofu, 1000 year old eggs, light soy sauce, green onions, sesame oil and a little fried onion on top.  It does not have to be cooked.






Is MSG bad for you or your food? Rose Wong explains.

Rose Wong is the founder of Pearl of the Orient restaurant which was the first restaurant in Cleveland Ohio to offer Northern and Szechuan Chinese cuisine when it opened in 1978.  She gave a cooking demonstration about Healthy Asian Cooking at an event at her sister Margaret Wong’s law offices.

She was asked about MSG and she explains what it is and why it was used and why she does not use it.

Cleveland Chinese

Cleveland Cooks



Use good oyster sauce and sesame and soy oils instead of MSG

Rose Wong is the founder of Pearl of the Orient restaurant which was the first restaurant in Cleveland Ohio to offer Northern and Szechuan Chinese cuisine when it opened in 1978.  She gave a cooking demonstration about Healthy Asian Cooking at an event at her sister Margaret Wong’s law offices.

Here she explains why she does not use MSG in the restaurant.  She uses good soy sauces, sesame oils and oyster sauce so doesn’t need more flavoring.


The Cleveland Chinese community

Cleveland Cooks for foodies and wannabe chefs




Dark Soy Sauce vs Light Soy Sauce

Rose Wong is the founder of Pearl of the Orient restaurant which was the first restaurant in Cleveland Ohio to offer Northern and Szechuan Chinese cuisine when it opened in 1978.

She gave a cooking demonstration about Healthy Asian Cooking at an event at her sister Margaret Wong’s law offices.

Here she explains the difference between dark soy sauce and light soy sauce.

Cooking tips

Chinese in Cleveland


Cooking stir fry in a wok

Rose Wong is the founder of Pearl of the Orient restaurant which was the first restaurant in Cleveland Ohio to offer Northern and Szechuan Chinese cuisine when it opened in 1978.  She gave a cooking demonstration about Healthy Asian Cooking at an event at her sister Margaret Wong’s law offices.

Here she says she like to use a lot of garlic and ginger and only a little oil, and only soy oil.  When cooking stir fry in a wok you cook an ingredient, then take it out, cook the next and then take it out and so on.

When all done and the wok is very hot you combine them all and then season it last.

Chinese in Cleveland

More cooking and food info at ClevelandCooks


How to tell if your wok is hot enough

Rose Wong is the founder of Pearl of the Orient restaurant which was the first restaurant in Cleveland Ohio to offer Northern and Szechuan Chinese cuisine when it opened in 1978.

She gave a cooking demonstration about Healthy Asian Cooking at an event at her sister Margaret Wong’s law offices.

Here she explains how important it is to have a very hot wok and how to tell if it is hot enough.

Cleveland Cooks

Chinese in Cleveland 



Chinese Cooking – Healthy because of stir fry and ingredients

Rose Wong is the founder of Pearl of the Orient restaurant which was the first restaurant in Cleveland Ohio to offer Northern and Szechuan Chinese cuisine when it opened in 1978.

She gave a cooking demonstration about Healthy Asian Cooking at an event at her sister Margaret Wong’s law offices.

This first clip tells how Chinese cooking is often healthy because of the stir frying and healthy ingredients such as tofu, ginger root, garlic, onions and even thousand year old eggs.

Cleveland Chinese

Cleveland Cooks




Margaret Wong welcome to Asian health event

Immigration Attorney Margaret Wong hosted an educational reception at her law offices in Cleveland to show healthy Asian cooking examples and to learn about the health issues of the Asian population.

This video is her brief welcome first in English and then in Chinese.




See more of the Chinese community of Cleveland

Monday, October 31, 2016

Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead)

The annual Day of the Dead (Día de Muertos) is a Mexican holiday celebrated throughout Mexico, in particular the Central and South regions, and by people of Mexican ancestry living in other places, especially the United States.

In Cleveland, the celebration centered at the Cleveland Public Theater. There was Latin food, live entertainment, displays and activities throughout the day. A highlight was the parade, Skulls and Skeletons.



Saturday, October 29, 2016

Happy Republic Day in Turkish at Turkish Garden Dedication in Cleveland

Ayla Gencer is president of the Turkish American Society of Northeastern Ohio (TASNO).  She taught the crowd how to say Happy Republic Day in Turkish and then they recited it.

 This was at the dedication of the new Turkish Garden in the Cleveland Cultural Gardens.  The dedication took place 93 years after the founding of the Republic of Turkey on October 29, 1923 by Mustafa Kemal Atatürk.

Turkish in Cleveland


TASNO president Ayla Gencer at Turkish Garden Dedication in Cleveland

Ayla Gencer is president of the Turkish American Society of Northeastern Ohio (TASNO.  She spoke at the dedication of the new Turkish Garden in the Cleveland Cultural Gardens.  The dedication took place 93 years after the founding of the Republic of Turkey on October 29, 1923 by Mustafa Kemal Atatürk.

Turks in Cleveland


Turkish History and Culture at Garden Dedication in Cleveland

Mehmet Gencer from the Turkish Cultural Garden committee spoke at the dedication of the new Turkish Garden in the Cleveland Cultural Gardens.  The dedication took place 93 years after the founding of the Republic of Turkey on October 29, 1923 by Mustafa Kemal Atatürk.

Gencer told about the culture and history of Turkey and how the Turkish Cultural Garden began.


Turkish in Cleveland

Turkish Cultural Garden Dedication in Cleveland Cultural Gardens

Mehmet Gencer from the Turkish Cultural Garden committee welcomed the crowd to the dedication of the new Turkish Garden in the Cleveland Cultural Gardens.  The dedication took place 93 years after the founding of the Republic of Turkey on October 29, 1923 by Mustafa Kemal Atatürk.

Gencer introduced Cleveland Cultural Gardens Federation president Sheila Murphy Crawford who welcomed the Turkish community to the family of Cultural Gardens.

Turks in Cleveland


Turkish Cultural Garden Dedication – Mehmet Gencer in Cleveland

Mehmet Gencer from the Turkish Cultural Garden committee told Dan Hanson of ClevelandPeople.com about the dedication of the new Turkish Garden in the Cleveland Cultural Gardens.
The dedication took place 93 years after the founding of the Republic of Turkey on October 29, 1923 by Mustafa Kemal Atatürk.


Turkish community in Cleveland



Sunday, October 23, 2016

Hungarian Scouts Honor Guard end 1956 anniversary event

Master of Ceremonies Michael Horvath retired the Hungarian Scout Honor Guard which ended the commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 in Cardinal Mindszenty Plaza in Cleveland, Ohio.

Cleveland Hungarians




Rev. Csaba Krasznai at 1956 Hungarian event in Mindszenty Plaza

Rt. Rev. Dr. Csaba Krasznai of the First Hungarian Reformed Church in Cleveland spoke at the commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 in Cardinal Mindszenty Plaza in Cleveland, Ohio.

Hungarians in Cleveland


Flowers at Freedom Fighter and Cardinal Mindszenty statues

Audience members placed flowers at the statues of the 1956 Freedom Fighter and Cardinal Mindszenty at the commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 in Cardinal Mindszenty Plaza in Cleveland, Ohio.



Wreaths at Freedom Fighter and Cardinal Mindszenty statues

Two 1956ers and two young Hungarian American Scouts placed wreaths at the statues of the 1956 Freedom Fighter and Cardinal Mindszenty at the commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 in Cardinal Mindszenty Plaza in Cleveland, Ohio. Then one of the 1956ers said a few words in Hungarian.

Hungarians in Cleveland


Our Father for Hungarian 1956ers

Master of Ceremonies Michael Horvath led a prayer for the 1956ers at the commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 in Cardinal Mindszenty Plaza in Cleveland, Ohio.

The crowd said the Our Father in Hungarian.

Cleveland Hungarians


Scout reads poem at 60th anniversary of Hungarian Revolution

Master of Ceremonies Michael Horvath introduced young Hungarian Scout Julian Biloshi at the commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 in Cardinal Mindszenty Plaza in Cleveland, Ohio. He recited a poem in Hungarian.

Hungarians in Cleveland

Hungarian Revolution of 1956 Ceremony in Cleveland

Master of Ceremonies Michael Horvath welcomed the crowd to the commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 in Cardinal Mindszenty Plaza in Cleveland, Ohio.

They then sang the national anthems of the United States and Hungary.


Hungarians in Cleveland


Master of Ceremonies Michael Horvath introduced Andrea Meszaros at a commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 in Cardinal Mindszenty Plaza in Cleveland, Ohio.

Andrea Meszaros spoke in Hungarian about the Hungarian Revolution of 1956.


Hungarians in Cleveland


Saturday, October 22, 2016

Statistics Done Wrong - Book Review

Author Alex Reinhart's s bio says "I’m a PhD student in statistics at Carnegie Mellon University, after previously earning my BSc in physics at the University of Texas at Austin while doing research on statistical methods to detect unexpected radioactive sources using mobile detectors. (I preferred to call it “finding radioactive people at football games.”) I now work on statistical models to understand and predict where crimes occur."

He obviously know his stuff - it just wasn't the stuff that I expected when I picked up the book.
As a mathematician I like to read books on various math disciplines especially topology, set theory and so on but also some applied topics such as probability and stats. I wrongly assumed that Statistics Gone Wrong would be about how methods and theorems of applied stats can lead to inaccurate results. The book is more for people who analyze data and make statistical predictions.

Don't get me wrong. The author does a very complete job in demonstrating how using stats can lead to inaccurate and even false conclusions. He starts with defining p values and gives examples of how they can lead to inaccuracies.

The use of examples is interesting such as the published results of the "Right turn on Red" data.

The author writes "If you’re a practicing scientist, you probably use statistics to analyze your data. From basic t tests and standard error calculations to Cox proportional hazards models and propensity score matching, we rely on statistics to give answers to scientific problems. This is unfortunate, because statistical errors are rife.


Statistics Done Wrong is a guide to the most popular statistical errors and slip-ups committed by scientists every day, in the lab and in peer-reviewed journals. Many of the errors are prevalent in vast swaths of the published literature, casting doubt on the findings of thousands of papers. Statistics Done Wrong assumes no prior knowledge of statistics, so you can read it before your first statistics course or after thirty years of scientific practice."

It's a good, solid book. Just don't expect it to be about probability and statistics. It is about the errors that can be made in analyzing data.




Friday, October 21, 2016

Hungarian Revolution of 1956 – Cleveland event conclusion

Jeanette Grasselli Brown served as Mistress of Ceremonies at the program celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Hungarian Revolution and Freedom Fight of 1956.  The event took place in the Rotunda of Cleveland City Hall and dozens of ‘56ers were in attendance.

She thanked keynote speaker and 56er Honorary Consul General of Hungary Laszlo Bojtos.

She then read part of the entry from the US Congressional Record about the 1956 Hungarian Revolution and then the flags of the US and Hungary were retired.


More from the 60th anniversary celebration in Cleveland



Hungarian Revolution of 1956 60th anniversary Ceremony in Cleveland

Jeanette Grasselli Brown served as Mistress of Ceremonies at the program celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Hungarian Revolution and Freedom Fight of 1956.  The event took place in the Rotunda of Cleveland City Hall and dozens of ‘56ers were in attendance.

She told how ‘60 years ago a small nation shook the foundation of the Communist world.’

The US and Hungarian flags were presented and Ted Horvath led the crowd in the US and Hungarian national anthems.


More on Hungarians in Cleveland and the 1956 Revolution

56ers from Hungarian Revolution of 1956 in Cleveland

Honorary Consul General of Hungary Laszlo Bojtos was a 56er.  He gave the keynote address at the program celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Hungarian Revolution and Freedom Fight of 1956.

The event took place in the Rotunda of Cleveland City Hall and dozens of ‘56ers were in attendance.

Consul Bojtos called for all the 56ers to stand and then a group photo was taken.

See more of the Hungarians in Cleveland


Hungarian Revolution of 1956 – Consul and 56er Laszlo Bojtos

As President John F. Kennedy said “October 23, 1956 is a day that will live forever in the annals of free men and nations. It was a day of courage, conscience and triumph. No other day since history began has shown more clearly the eternal unquenchability of man’s desire to be free, whatever the odds against success, whatever the sacrifice required.”

Honorary Consul General of Hungary Laszlo Bojtos was a 56er.  He gave the keynote address at the program celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Hungarian Revolution and Freedom Fight of 1956.

The event took place in the Rotunda of Cleveland City Hall and dozens of ‘56ers were in attendance. Consul Bojtos told of his experiences in 1956.

Hungarians in Cleveland


Hungary 1956 - Who is not with us, is against us

A 56er told the motto of his countrymen during the Hungarian Revolution of 1956.  This was at the program celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Hungarian Revolution and Freedom Fight of 1956.

The event took place in the Rotunda of Cleveland City Hall and dozens of ‘56ers were in attendance.

He spoke the saying in Hungarian and then translated it as ‘Who is not with us is against us.’


See more of the Hungarians in Cleveland


Invocation at Hungarian Revolution of 1956 Ceremony

Rt. Rev. Dr. Csaba Krasznai of the First Hungarian Reformed Church gave the Invocation at the program celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Hungarian Revolution and Freedom Fight of 1956.

The event took place in the Rotunda of Cleveland City Hall and dozens of ‘56ers were in attendance.

Rev. Krasznai first spoke in English and then Hungarian.

Hungarians in Cleveland


Cleveland Mayor Jackson at Hungarian Revolution of 1956 Ceremony

The Crack in the Berlin Wall began with a hole in a flag in Budapest!

At one time (maybe still) there were more Hungarians in Cleveland than anywhere in the world outside of Budapest.  Many Hungarians came here in 1956 because of the Fight for Freedom against the Soviet Union in Hungary.

 Mistress of Ceremonies Jeanette Grasselli Brown introduced Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson at the program celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Hungarian Revolution and Freedom Fight of 1956. 

The event took place in the Rotunda of Cleveland City Hall and dozens of ‘56ers were in attendance.


Wednesday, October 19, 2016

St Casimir Church 125th Anniversary

It was a big weekend for Greater Cleveland's Polish American Community. To celebrate the 125th Anniversary of the founding of St. Casimir's Parish, Fr. Eric Orzech, pastor of both St. Casimir and St. Stanislaus Churches invited the Most Reverend Andrzej Wypych, the Auxiliary Bishop of Chicago to be the Celebrant and Homilist at the Sunday, October 16th, 11:30 AM Solemn Mass of Thanksgiving



Bishop Andrzej Wypych, Fr Eric Orzech, altar servers and children of the Sienkiewicz Polish Language School and Piast Dancers


See more from the 125th anniversary of St Casimir Church in Cleveland

Friday, October 14, 2016

Painting the Finnish flag on little girls hands

When the crowd visited the Finnish Cultural Garden in Cleveland on the first annual Kids Fest in the Cleveland Cultural Gardens one of the activities was having the Finnish flag painted on your hand or making your own Finnish flag.


Saturday, October 08, 2016

Why and how major protests were avoided in Cleveland

Jose Feliciano, president of the Hispanic Roundtable, asked Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson about the relationship between Cleveland police and the community and how they were able to avoid major protests.

This was at the 2016 Convencion Hispana.

GreatLakesGeek.com



Who can Hispanic community call at Cleveland City Hall?

Jose Feliciano, president of the Hispanic Roundtable, asked Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson and Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish who the community could call on.  He also asked if there could be a Hispanic Advisory Council.      This was at the 2016 Convencion Hispana.



Hispanics in Cleveland







Agitate – Raise your voice at City Hall - Convencion Hispana

Jose Feliciano, president of the Hispanic Roundtable, asked Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson and Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish about a West 25th Street project in particular and how to get noticed and action for the community in general.



They both recalled Lonnie Burton who had recommended: “Agitate, agitate, agitate.” And the Mayor said you need to be persistent and consistent.   This was at the 2016 Convencion Hispana.





http://www.clevelandpeople.com/groups/hispanic/hispanic.htm









Hispanics in leadership roles in Cleveland

Jose Feliciano, president of the Hispanic Roundtable, asked Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson and Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish about how the city of Cleveland and Cuyahoga County are doing with having Hispanics in leadership positions.  This was at the 2016 Convencion Hispana.

Hispanics in Cleveland


Question about Contributions of Hispanics in Cleveland

Jose Feliciano, president of the Hispanic Roundtable, asked Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson and Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish about the accomplishments of local Hispanics.

This was at the 2016 Convencion Hispana.

Hispanics in Cleveland and Cuyahoga County


Convencion Hispana 2016 – Mayor Jackson, County Exec Budish

Jose Feliciano, president of the Hispanic Roundtable, introduced Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson and Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish at the 2016 Convencion Hispana. The two leaders then gave their opening remarks.


Hispanics in Cleveland


Convencion Hispana 2016 – Invocation

Jose Feliciano, president of the Hispanic Roundtable, introduced Reverend for the invocation at the 2016 Convencion Hispana.







Convencion Hispana 2016 – Jose Feliciano introduction

Jose Feliciano, president of the Hispanic Roundtable, told how the Convencion Hispana is meant to “transform our community” and has the 3 goals of Economic Development, Empowerment and Education.

He said that somewhere in the US is a Hispanic person living now who will be the first Hispanic president of the United States.

Hispanics in Cleveland



 

Own nation for Kurdish people?

Former President of Lebanon (1982-1988) Amine Gemayel spoke at Case Western Reserve University on the topic: Managing the World Crisis of the Middle East: Imperatives and Alternatives.

He was asked about the possibility of a future nation for the Kurdish people.

Middle East community in Cleveland


Israel and Arab world unite against Isis?

Former President of Lebanon (1982-1988) Amine Gemayel spoke at Case Western Reserve University on the topic: Managing the World Crisis of the Middle East: Imperatives and Alternatives.

He was asked about the possibility of Israel and the Arab world uniting to defeat Isis.

 

Lebanon’s Cultural and Arts Heritage

Former President of Lebanon (1982-1988) Amine Gemayel spoke at Case Western Reserve University on the topic: Managing the World Crisis of the Middle East: Imperatives and Alternatives.

He was asked about the importance of arts and culture.

Lebanese community in Cleveland


Separation of politics and religion in Lebanon

Former President of Lebanon (1982-1988) Amine Gemayel spoke at Case Western Reserve University on the topic: Managing the World Crisis of the Middle East: Imperatives and Alternatives.

Ramez Islambouli, a native of Lebanon and Arabic language professor at Case Western Reserve University, asked if he would support the election of a president of Lebanon even if not a Christian?