Sunday, January 15, 2017

Chinese Tangram Puzzle

Mathematician Dan Hanson spoke at the ClevelandPeople.Com Food Adventure to The Pearl Asian Kitchen.  The Food Adventurers travel to authentic ethnic restaurants in the Cleveland area and, besides enjoying a special traditional menu, learn about the culture of the country.

Dan told about and demonstrated the popular Chinese Tangram Puzzle whcih was as popular as the Rubik's Cube when it came out.





Cleveland Chinese community

Great Lakes Geek Science and Math



Here is a duck made of the 7 Tangram puzzle pieces



Say Happy New Year in Chinese

As we get close to Chinese New Year (Year of the Rooster) Luling Li taught the audience how to say Happy New Year in Mandarin.




Cleveland Chinese community

Chinese Math and the Abacus

Mathematician Dan Hanson spoke at the ClevelandPeople.Com Food Adventure to The Pearl Asian Kitchen.  The Food Adventurers travel to authentic ethnic restaurants in the Cleveland area and, besides enjoying a special traditional menu, learn about the culture of the country.

Dan told some basics about Chinese mathematics and the Chinese abacus which is able to do hexadecimal calculation as opposed to abacuses from other countries.


Cleveland Chinese community

Great Lakes Geek Math and Science

 

Counting in Chinese

Luling Li teaches Chinese language at Shaker Heights High School. She spoke at the ClevelandPeople.Com Food Adventure to The Pearl Asian Kitchen.  The Food Adventurers travel to authentic ethnic restaurants in the Cleveland area and, besides enjoying a special traditional menu, learn about the culture of the country.

 Luling taught the audience the characters and pronunciation of numbers in Mandarin.






  Cleveland Chinese community

Why Cantonese and Mandarin languages in China

Luling Li teaches Chinese language at Shaker Heights High School. She spoke at the ClevelandPeople.Com Food Adventure to The Pearl Asian Kitchen.  The Food Adventurers travel to authentic ethnic restaurants in the Cleveland area and, besides enjoying a special traditional menu, learn about the culture of the country.

Luling showed a map of China and told why the Cantonese language is popular but that Mandarin is the official main language.






Cleveland Chinese community


5 basic Chinese characters

Luling Li teaches Chinese language at Shaker Heights High School. She spoke at the ClevelandPeople.Com Food Adventure to The Pearl Asian Kitchen.  The Food Adventurers travel to authentic ethnic restaurants in the Cleveland area and, besides enjoying a special traditional menu, learn about the culture of the country.

Luling showed 5 important Chinese characters.



Cleveland Chinese community


Confucius Institute of Cleveland State University

Anthony Yen introduced Dr. Xu, director of the Confucius Institute at Cleveland State University and Professor Xuhong Zhang, Associate Director of the Confucius Institute at the ClevelandPeople.Com Food Adventure to The Pearl Asian Kitchen.  The Food Adventurers travel to authentic ethnic restaurants in the Cleveland area and, besides enjoying a special traditional menu, learn about the culture of the country.

The group learned about the many important works of the Confucius Institute including Chinese New Year’s celebrations and scholarships.





Cleveland Chinese community

Powerful distilled Chinese liquor called Maotai

Anthony Yen and Dr. Wang Yunmei spoke about the Chinese Garden, part of the Cleveland Cultural Gardens.

Yen mentioned that some workers wanted to try Maotai which is very strong distilled Chinese liquor, made in the town of Maotai in China's Guizhou province.


   

See more about the Food Adventures

Cleveland Chinese community

Cleveland Cooks
 

Chinese Cultural Garden in Cleveland

Anthony Yen and Dr. Wang Yunmei spoke about the Chinese Garden, part of the Cleveland Cultural Gardens.  They emphasized the importance of teachers who are honored in the Chinese Garden each year.  

They also spoke about the huge 7.5 ton granite Confucius statue and the male and female lion statues which protect the Chinese Garden.  


See more about the Food Adventures

Cleveland Chinese community

4 famous novels of China

Lt. Colonel Joseph Meissner spoke to the ClevelandPeople.Com Food Adventurers at The Pearl Asian Kitchen.  The Food Adventurers travel to authentic ethnic restaurants in the Cleveland area and, besides enjoying a special traditional menu, learn about the culture of the country.

Meissner spoke about the 4 most famous novels:

  1. Romance of the Three Kingdoms,
  2. Dream of the Red Chamber,
  3. Water Margin and 
  4. Journey to the West

See more about the Food Adventures

Cleveland Chinese community

Flaming Sweet & Sour Fish at The Pearl Asian Kitchen

It was pretty cool to see the servers light up the plates at the Food Adventure to The Pearl.

This short video clip shows the lighting of the Flaming Sweet &adve Sour Fish presented to the diners.


See more about the Food Adventures

Cleveland Chinese community

Cleveland Cooks


 

Difference between American and Chinese dining

Chef Rose Wong told of a fundamental difference between American and Chinese dining.

For example, in Chinese dining it is impolite to fill the plate.  Everything goes into a small bowl bite sized pieces at a time.




See more about the Food Adventures

Cleveland Chinese community

Cleveland Cooks
 

Chinese Bird’s Nest Soup

Chef Rose Wong of the Pearl Asian Kitchen Restaurant (formerly Pearl of the Orient) in Shaker Heights Ohio, explained Chinese food to the ClevelandPeople.Com Food Adventurers.  The Food Adventurers travel to authentic ethnic restaurants in the Cleveland area and, besides enjoying a special traditional menu, learn about the culture of the country.

Chef Rose Wong told of the expensive delicacy called bird’s nest soup.


See more about the Food Adventures

Cleveland Chinese community

Cleveland Cooks


 

Lucky Chinese Red Envelopes

As we approach Chinese New Year you will undoubtedly see red envelopes at Chinese restaurants and stores.  In this video clip Chef Rose Wong told of the lucky red envelopes with money in them that are for good luck.


See more about the Food Adventures

Cleveland Chinese community

Cleveland Cooks
 




Lucky names for Chinese Food

Chef Rose Wong told of some of the colorful names of Chinese food that come from pronunciation, legend and superstitions.

For example, they always have fish because the word for fish rhymes with surplus.  The head of the fish should face the guest of honor.

The word for lettuce is raw vegetable which rhymes with growing wealth.

See more about the Food Adventures

Cleveland Chinese community

Cleveland Cooks


 

Strange Chinese Food Names – Ants Climbing Tree

Chef Rose Wong of the Pearl Asian Kitchen Restaurant (formerly Pearl of the Orient) in Shaker Heights Ohio, explained Chinese food to the ClevelandPeople.Com Food Adventurers.  The Food Adventurers travel to authentic ethnic restaurants in the Cleveland area and, besides enjoying a special traditional menu, learn about the culture of the country.

Chef Rose Wong told of some of the colorful names of Chinese food that come from pronunciation, legend and superstitions.

For example, the dish called Ants climbing tree is basically ground beef or pork over fried vermicelli. Field Chicken is really frogs.  Spring rolls are lucky because they look like gold bars.  Glutinous rice is good for family unity.

See more about the Food Adventures

Cleveland Chinese community

Cleveland Cooks
 



Saturday, January 14, 2017

Chinese Food Sauces – No such thing as Duck Sauce?

Chef Rose Wong of the Pearl Asian Kitchen Restaurant (formerly Pearl of the Orient) in Shaker Heights Ohio, explained Chinese food to the ClevelandPeople.Com Food Adventurers.

The Food Adventurers travel to authentic ethnic restaurants in the Cleveland area and, besides enjoying a special traditional menu, learn about the culture of the country.

 Chef Rose Wong explained one of the appetizers being served and then the sauces that were on the table.  She said there is no such thing as duck sauce and they don’t put soy sauce on the table.


Cleveland Cooks

Chinese in Cleveland


Chinese Food – 5 different flavors and geographical differences

Chef Rose Wong of the Pearl Asian Kitchen Restaurant (formerly Pearl of the Orient) in Shaker Heights Ohio, explained Chinese food to the ClevelandPeople.Com Food Adventurers.  The Food Adventurers travel to authentic ethnic restaurants in the Cleveland area and, besides enjoying a special traditional menu, learn about the culture of the country.

Chef Rose Wong told of the 5 different flavors of Chinese food and how the food varies in different parts (North, South, etc.) of China.

She said that Chinese will eat anything that moves and everything inside and out of whatever moves.

Cleveland Cooks

Cleveland Chinese

Food Adventurers



Friday, January 13, 2017

Shaker Heights Mayor Leikin at Food Adventurers event

Shaker Heights Mayor Earl Leikin welcomed the ClevelandPeople.Com Food Adventurers to the Peal Restaurant and applauded them for their commitment to diversity.

The Food Adventurers travel to authentic ethnic restaurants in the Cleveland area and, besides enjoying a special traditional menu, learn about the culture of the country.

The Pearl (formerly Pearl of the Orient) is run by Chef Rose Wong and the evening included many glimpses into the culture of China. Debbie Hanson from ClevelandPeople.Com introduced the Mayor.

Food Adventurers

Chinese in Cleveland


Saturday, January 07, 2017

The Manga Guide to Physiology

The Manga Guide to Physiology
by Etsuro Tanaka and Keiko Koyama 

I asked lightheartedly on Twitter "Is there something wrong in getting medical advice from a Manga comic book?" because I have found the information in The Manga Guide to Physiology  to be more complete and understandable than many medical websites. Of course the book should not replace a medical professional but it does give a very comprehensive look at the workings of the human body.




And, of course, the format of the book (Manga comic book with an interesting story line and great illustrations) makes it more readable than a textbook. I found myself saying "Just one more chapter" which would never have been the case in a typical physiology text book.

Like the other Manga guides the information is presented using young characters involved in something to keep your interest. In The Manga Guide to Physiology a Nursing School freshman named Kumiko needs to pass a test on the human body in order to compete in the campus marathon which she is simultaneously training for. She is tutored by a young professor who turns out to be someone unexpected.

Don't be fooled and think that because of this background story the information is fluff. The information presented is detailed but presented in a clear manner with examples that will make you understand the subject rather than help you memorize facts. In addition there is always an "Even More About…" section that gets into more details for those who want it.

The sections give a complete look at how the body works:

  • The Circulatory System
  • The Respiratory System
  • The Digestive System
  • The Kidneys and Renal System
  • Body Fluids
  • The Brain and Nervous System
  • The Sensory Nervous System
  • The Musculoskeletal System
  • Cells, Genes and Reproduction
  • The Endocrine System

The No Starch Press Manga series and in particular this book, The Manga Guide to Physiology, have become a valuable platform to learn some complicated subjects in an engaging way.


Great Lakes Geek Rating: 4.5 out of 5 pocket protectors.

Read more Book Reviews from the Great Lakes Geek

Saturday, December 31, 2016

Association of Indian Physicians of Northern Ohio Medical Yatra

Association of Indian Physicians of Northern Ohio (AIPNO) was founded in 1983 as a non-profit organization of physicians of Indian origin in Northern Ohio.

With a membership of over 300 physicians who meet regularly for educational, charitable and social events, the organization provides an opportunity to make meaningful contributions to the local community and to make friendships that last.

AIPNO also provides service and aid to undeserved areas and disaster affected sites. The Medical YATRA Mission is to Educate, Prevent and Save Lives!

More on the AIPNO Medical Yatras


Roberto Clemente

Roberto Clemente was an amazing baseball player and an even better human being.

When the earthquake hit Managua, Nicaragua on December 23, 1972 thousands were killed and many more homeless.  Clemente helped organize a relief effort.

On New Year's Eve he and 4 other boarded a plane for Managua with supplies to help the people. Shortly after takeoff the plane crashed into the ocean and all were killed.

In 1973, Roberto Clemente became the first Hispanic player elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Friday, December 30, 2016

Thursday, December 29, 2016

International New Year Traditions

Here are a few international New Year traditions:

First Stepper. A very old tradition in England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales revolves around your guests on New Year's Day. The first person to enter your home in the New Year will have a significant impact on year's to come. Here's how you can take part in this tradition.
Make note of who that first person is to enter your home. In fact, you may want to write it down, since the information won't really be of use to you for a year. At then end of the year decide if your year has been a good one or a bad one; lucky or unlucky. If you feel it has been a positive year then on the next New Year's Day, don't let anyone else in the house until that first person from the "lucky year" comes in.
If, however, you have had a bad or unlucky year, do whatever you must to have someone else be "the first stepper" into your home, so the luck will change for the upcoming year.



The Dutch believe it is important to "eat out the Old Year and Eat in the New" so they start a meal before midnight and finish it after, just to be sure there is food all year.




Although it is said that farm animals talk on New Year's Day, a superstition from Romania says it is important to avoid the animals because hearing them talk is very bad luck.




Egyptians once believed that onions kept evil spirits away; so many New Year's dishes with Egyptian roots will include onions.




Eating twelve grapes at midnight is a Spanish custom also said to bring good luck.




In Denmark, residents keep a pile of dishes, all broken, in front of the door. For this they save old dishes and People usually throw these on the friends’ doors during New Year. This symbolizes friendship and brotherhood and they believe the one with maximum dishes outside, has the most friends. Some Danish are found to leap some chairs during midnight.




Brazilians believe that lentils signify wealth and prosperity. So they serve food items made up of the legume like soup or rice on the New Year.




Germans pour molten lead into cold water and the shape that is taken after, predicts the future. Heart shapes symbolize marriage whereas round shapes denote good luck; anchor shapes tell that you need help however a cross signifies someone’s sad demise.




Filipinos consume grapes, have coins, wear polkas dotted dresses, as they have faith that circular things attract more fortune and money. They also throw coins as New Year begins to increase wealth and prosperity.




Japanese New Year or Oshogatsu is meant for celebrations with family and it begins with proper decoration of the home to welcome luck and fortune. They clean the entire house, get themselves off from every financial liability, and resolve all issues before the New Year hits. They follow traditions of three things: a pine branch, called kadomatsu, denotes longevity; a stalk of bamboo symbolizes prosperity, whereas a plum blossom shows nobility. Before the clock strikes 12, they ring 108 bells to show that the all 108 troubles have been eliminated.

Friday, December 16, 2016

Multicultural Fashion Show Grand Finale

The Multicultural Fashion Show at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation ended with a bang as all of the 120 people who participated in the fashion show came back on stage.

Ethnic groups in Cleveland and Northeast Ohio


Multicultural Fashion Show Part 4: Palestine to Zambia

The Multicultural Fashion Show at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation continued.

120 people participated in the fashion show and each walked the runway to music from their country.

The fourth group included fashions from Palestine, Puerto Rico, Russia, Senegal, Serbia, Tanzania and Zambia.

Ethnic communities in Cleveland


Multicultural Fashion Show Part 3: Lebanon to Nepal

The Multicultural Fashion Show at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation continued. 120 people participated in the fashion show and each walked the runway to music from their country.


The third group included fashions from Lebanon, Lithuania, Mexico, Morocco and Nepal.

See all of Cleveland's ethnic communities




Multicultural Fashion Show Part 2: Egypt to Kuwait

The Multicultural Fashion Show at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation continued. 120 people participated in the fashion show and each walked the runway to music from their country.

 The second group included fashions from Egypt, Hawaii, the Hmong Community, Iran, Jordan and Kuwait.

Cleveland's ethnic communities


Multicultural Fashion Show Part 1: Armenia to China

ICC-WIN president Ken Kovach welcomed the crowd to the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.

He then introduced Fashion Show Chair Nada Martinovic and the 2016 Fashion Show began.  120 people participated in the fashion show and each walked the runway to music from their country.

The first group included fashions from Armenia, Bavaria, Bhutan, Cameroon and China.

Cleveland's ethnic communities


Tepehuani Nelli Mexican Ensemble in Cleveland

Tepehuani Nelli Mexican Ensemble performed traditional Aztec and Mexican dances at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.

Mexicans in Cleveland


Thursday, December 15, 2016

Drums and dances from Senegal at Cleveland Multicultural Party

The second performance from JAPO African Ensemble from Senegal on drums and in dance at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.

African in Cleveland


JAPO African Ensemble at Cleveland Multicultural Party

JAPO African Ensemble from Senegal performed on drums and in a dance at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.

Africans in Cleveland


2016 ICC-WIN Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration Welcome

ICC-WIN president Ken Kovach welcomed the crowd to the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation ended.

He also introduced event Chairman Mehmet Gencer who thanked the committee members and then Nada Martinovic who chaired the performances.


Honor the Moon dance by Sho Jo Ji Japanese Dancers

The Sho Jo Ji Japanese Dancers performed a dance honoring the moon at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.

Japanese in Cleveland




Royal procession dance by Sho Jo Ji Japanese Dancers

The Sho Jo Ji Japanese Dancers performed a dance telling the story of royal lords and ladies processing into Edo which later was renamed as Tokyo.  They performed at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.

Japanese in Cleveland


Sakura (Cherry Blossom) dance by Sho Jo Ji Japanese Dancers

Sakura (Cherry Blossom) dance by Sho Jo Ji Japanese Dancers at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation. This is the 60th anniversary of Sho-Jo-Ji which was founded in 1956.

Japanese in Cleveland


Impromptu dance jam at Cleveland multicultural party

When the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation was over, people wanted to stay for more.  Several jumped on stage and began dancing.


Goodnight from Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration

ICC-WIN president Ken Kovach thanked the crowd and gave best wishes as the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation ended.

Cleveland ethnic events


Grand Finale from Hula Fusion Polynesian Ensemble

The grand finale hula dance from the Hula Fusion Polynesian Ensemble at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.

More Cleveland ethnic events


Hula Fusion Polynesian Ensemble at Cleveland Multicultural Party

Yet another hula dance.

Dancers from the Hula Fusion Polynesian Ensemble performed another traditional hula dance at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.


Another Hula dance from Hula Fusion Polynesian Ensemble

Dancers from the Hula Fusion Polynesian Ensemble performed a traditional hula dance at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.


Hula dance about Seaweed at Cleveland Multicultural Party

Dancers from the Hula Fusion Polynesian Ensemble performed a traditional hula dance about seaweed at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.


Pacific Islanders in Cleveland

More Cleveland ethnic event coverage


Traditional Hula dance at Cleveland Multicultural Party

Dancers from the Hula Fusion Polynesian Ensemble performed a traditional hula dance at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.

This was their introduction and opening dance.


Hula dance from Tahiti at Cleveland Multicultural Party

Dancers from the Hula Fusion Polynesian Ensemble performed a hula dance from Tahiti at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.

Pacific Islanders in Cleveland

ICC-WIN party and other ethnic events in Cleveland



Electric ball dance from New Zealand

A dancer from the Hula Fusion Polynesian Ensemble performed a New Zealand dance with two lighted balls on strings in the dark called Electric Poi at the 7th annual Cleveland Multicultural Holiday Celebration put on by the International Community Council Worldwide Intercultural Network (ICC-WIN) in Cleveland at the Global Center for Health Innovation.


New Zealanders in Cleveland


Wednesday, December 07, 2016

Pear Harbor Day Remembered

A Day that will live in Infamy

75 years! How the world has changed in the 75 years since the December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor.

We talked to some local people about their memories of that day. Here are some excerpts of what they had to say.

One woman remembers being a young girl at the time.

"I was at home with my family listening to Irish music on the radio, when they cut in and told us Pearl Harbor had been bombed. We didn't know what to do - I was only eleven years old, but I was sure we were going to be bombed and we were all going into battle. I had to do something, but I had no idea what. So I prepared as best I could. I cleaned all of my drawers and organized all of my things. I was going to be ready if we were invaded.
The next day was a Holy Day - Mary's Day - the Feast of the Immaculate Conception. As Catholics we all went to Mass and afterwards everyone stood around together outside. The adults were all talking very seriously and the kids were all looking up to see if there were planes coming to bomb us.



The burning wreckage of the U.S. Navy battleship USS Arizona (BB-39)
at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii December 7, 1941.


Kevin says:

"Sure, it changed our lives a lot. But not as much as places like England and Europe who were being bombed all the time. I was pretty young - only 8 - so I don't know a lot of details. But everyone was always serious and scared.
All of a sudden there would be a loud shrill noise - a siren it was. Then there would be an Air Raid Drill. Everyone had to turn off all of their lights and pull their shades down, so the enemy couldn't find us. No one was allowed outside. There was a neighborhood man who would come around and make sure we were all following the rules. It was very scary."


Everyone seemed to remember the drills. The other thing they remembered were the rationing and shortages. Everyone was allotted a certain amount of food stamps and gas cards and somehow they had to make it work. Nylon stockings were unavailable - nylon was needed for the war. Meat was sent to the troops. There were year long waiting lists for new cars and a new pair of shoes was like gold.

Grace explains the feeling.

"There were no protests in the streets. Everybody was proud of the USA. Even Hollywood supported the country. Many of them did USO shows. Bob Hope was never home for the holidays. He was always off entertaining the troops. We all banded together.
I got married in November, 1941. My husband went to the war. So did my cousins, brothers, uncles and friends. Some came home, some didn't. We were proud as could be of each and every one of them. It was such a different time."






USS Pennsylvania, behind the wreckage of
the USS Downes and USS Cassin
.


As serious as everything was at that time there was also a special feeling of camaraderie. Here's how Laura describes it:

"Pianos were very popular at the time. That was a big form of entertainment. After Pearl Harbor we still stood around the piano but now the songs were all about the war and very patriotic. We didn't have a television so we went to the movies a lot. There was always a newsreel before the feature that kept us informed. We all read the newspapers and listened to the radio too. Even little kids wore buttons on their coats calling for the death of "the rats": Hitler, Mussolini and Tojo.
Sometimes I think we all got closer because we had a common enemy."

All of the people we talked to remember sending Care Packages. Some contained toiletries and Band-Aids while others sent cookies and food from home. They all knew anything from home was welcome.
Many women started working outside the home for the first time. Working ten to twelve hours seven days a week in a factory was not unusual.




Of course this meant children learned to do things they never had to do before. Cooking, cleaning, even shopping fell in the hands of people in the home.

Mildred remembers another change:

"All of a sudden stars started showing up in the windows of people's homes. If I remember correctly, a blue star meant they had someone in the service, and a gold star meant someone died. Some houses had a lot of stars - I guess those were the ones with a lot of sons. Course women went in the WAVES and WACS too, but I didn't know any. It was the boys that I remember going.

And then one day when I went to Church there was a plague up on the wall and it listed the names of the guys from our church and our neighborhood who had died in the war. I couldn't believe it. I knew some of those guys - or their families. Then every week when we went to church the plague had more names.

We started hearing stories about what I call real heroes. The guys who were at Pearl Harbor. The ones who were shot down on their last trip - or even their first trip. The ones who had permanent disabilities as a result of their service. And the women who were left at home with little kids. These are heroes. We all prayed like crazy for all of them."


Inside the shrine room of the USS Arizona memorial in Pearl Harbor - To the Memory of the Gallant Men Here Entombed and their shipmates who gave their lives in action on December 7, 1941, on the U.S.S. Arizona" — inscription in marble with the names of Arizona's honored dead


December 7, 1941. President Roosevelt declared it to be a Date That Will Live in Infamy. How right he was.